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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
and of course their religions were around me and a lot of folk religion, so one can say that this might be seen as the blossoming of the way that i came in to the world. >> what part of china? >> inland, rural, 70 miles from shanghai. >> what time period are we talking about? >> you know, being chinese in my formation, we look on age as honor, so i'm proud to say that i was born 76 years ago i'm 76 years convenientable. >> and who i long did you grow up in china. >> i was 17 when i came to this country. >> so that's formative. let's talk a little bit about the impact of the modern world on the traditional chinese religious systems when you were growing up. did you see the challenges to those religious systems at that time or was it too early? >> no, we were -- well, it was too early but also we were too rural and therefore modern things had made very few in roads. when i came to this country with this traditional background then i slammed in to it and actually slammed into it hard, because my longest teaching appointment was at mit which is almost like the modern and the future in a microcosm.
of the 20th century. he did not in the end adopt some foreign religion. he adopted his own religion, that of his ancestors. similarly, we don't have to seek to have islamist convert to what is to them a foreign religion, but rather an islam of their own ancestors, one and poisoned by the extremism we associate with wahhabism and al qaeda. the problem for us is that christianity was very much part of western culture and something that we were knowledgeable about and suited to fight over. islam is different. is hard for our government to be effective with the struggle of that religion. i just want to also note by the way ,-com,-com ma because charlie mentioned an awful, the journey. "witness" was one of the greatest autobiographical groups on extremism. perhaps one of the greatest novels about it. and they had great political impacts in part because they were great literary works, works of art. there are some islamic works about breaking with extremism. the islamist by ed hussein, radical i -- but i don't think there are any such works that are great works of art scene from the point
was put in there. remember, this is the second amendment, second only after free speech, religion. the founders took this very, very seriously. this is not an amendment to guarantee the right to hunt squirrels. so it's very important that we have an adult conversation, stop ranting and raving over gun violence. of course, we all hate gun violence. but for example, let us ask the question, why have we seen the mass shootings that we have? it is not the law-abiding citizens, using their guns. in fact, there is a very close connection with psychiatric drugs. i have a forbes column i wrote that should be appearing very soon, it draws the connection between the presence of these psychiatric drug, people -- those so-called lone wolf shooters, especially the young people who are on these psychiatric drugs, anti-depressants or in withdrawal from them, why isn't congress holding hearings on this? rather than pulling the nra do into these meetings and brow-beating them over exercising a right that the founders guaranteed, why not invite the pharmaceutical companies into capitol hill and see
humans? our modern human ancestors practiced ritual and religion. similar evidence for neanderthals has been elusive. then a team of archaeologists made an intriguing discovery in southern spain. their finds hint at the existence of a neanderthal ritual. inside this cave, a team led by michael walker excavated a deep shaft in which they found more than 300 bones from around ten neanderthals buried by rockfalls from the unstable ceiling. three of the neanderthals stood out. walker thinks they weren't necessarily the victims of a rockfall. if there are rocks falling on you from a natural rockfall, it would be very strange to find nobody trying to escape and one of them with the hands close to the head in almost sleeping position. narrator: although the bones of this young female are fused to the limestone rock and are hard to see, michael walker thinks her body may have been carefully arranged in a fetal position. if he's right, this was no rockfall. around 50,000 years ago, someone had intentionally buried her piling stones to protect her body. and this cave had yet mor
. >>> where do u.s. religious institutions stand on guns and gun control? like the topic of religion to do so, sometimes there's no simple answer but we will look at a new poll ahead. but first -- >>> extreme makeover host ty pennington has joined our sister network hln. his new series "american journey" is about thinkers, entrepreneurs, and what we can learn from them. this week's "american journey" takes us to the coast of maine. >> the lobstermen of maine are a rare breed. bold, brave, and fiercely independent. they spend long days and lonely nights out at sea. the ocean provides a good life for their faeges and it's been that way for generations, but now these proud fishermen are working harder for less money. they're fed up, but they're more determined than ever to keep this tradition alive. i'm ty pennington, and this is their "american journey." ♪ >> i'm jason joyce. i'm an eighth generation lobster fisherman on swan's island, maine. you know, this is where my family has fished for the last four generations. i own the boat, i run the boat. it's a small business, it's a family busines
are a satanic religion, you cannot rationally argue with people who think that the earth was created 6000 years ago and adam and eve road on the backs of dinosaurs. the only thing they you can do is integrate them back into the economy. when you fall to that level of desperation, and this is exactly what tore apart yugoslavia a year ago, we had several hundred white guys dressed in confederate in remorse, marching through montgomery. -- uniforms, marching through montgomery. you cannot carry out a dialogue. that is what frightens me. movements of celebrate the language of violence, demonize the marginal and week, whether feminists, african-americans, liberals -- i see that breakdown occurring because of the economic disintegration. having lived through it in places like yugoslavia, rational arguments do not work. her >> tomorrow night and watched this entire event with supporters of the occupied movement. -- tomorrow night you can watch this entire event but supporters of the occupied movement. -- occupy movement. 8:00 eastern time here on c- span. >> the big discussion that i remember was, wha
its own religion and incompatible view of the other will have to put up with one another and find ways to work together. with apple and google, we compete in the mobile world, but we are also search partners. >> there are others who are not members of the gang of four. >> there are many potential candidates. twitter is 1. even netflix, which i mentioned. and of course microsoft is absent in my calculation, although they certainly wish that they were. [laughter] >> we have some very good questions from the floor that relate to some of this. one question is "hall will scrutiny over the use of user data affect business strategies ?" >> what happens with all of these companies that collect a lot of data, each of them has different views -- rules. their behavior will largely be controlled by the european privacy laws. there's something called the european data protectorate, which is all about what you do with this data. and old simile, the street solution is going to say the data is owned by the person, not the company, or at least not to be used without that person's permission. anonymous
. the question is what is the role of religion either from the terrorist perspective or the combating counterterrorism perspective. from the terrorist perspective what we have mostly found is that adhere rens from al qaeda broadly misinterpreted and taken extremist views and perverted islam as a religion to be able to coerce and otherwise control their followers in doing things that are very much what the tenants of islam would say. we quoted a scholar and others that talked about the prohibition of killing innocent civilians. when they talk about the majority of people being killed by al qaeda are muslims contradicted the religion of islam and appointmented out they were violating the tenants. so in general, helping to highlight the perversion of the religion in terms of the information we are doing has been helpful and that is what was done with the deadly vanguards report. it identified the problems that al qaeda was having when it was killing civilians it violates what many of the other moderate, main stream muslim scholars were saying. with regard to the counterterrorism focus, i
caller. >> caller: it's deplorable that republicans always find their religion when measures are needed that doesn't affect areas of their concern. i didn't see anybody asking for offsets when, and the federal debt and deficit was blooming with george bush, and nobody wanted offsets to help those in the disaster relief all the way up until this president got in office. he came in with a federal debt and deficit already ballooned, but everybody found religion on spending after george bush hut the wars on the credit card and the medicare part d on the credit card. it was under already, and now they found religion and cut all programs that affect people that didn't cause the downturn or didn't cause the ballooning of the debt so they find religion when it doesn't affect them. >> guest: the club for growth had a consistent position on this. we are akooked of being uncaring when it comes time to disaster relief, and it's an up fair accusation because we want people to get help that they need, but we think it ought to be paid for and not to put the burden or spread the burden larger. it shoul
where everybody sort of gets religion and says we're going to do it, but we're going to be on our way back. >> some positive signs. economic growth will probably pick up and a good chance we'll get comprehensive immigration reform in 2013, which would be good for any number of reasons. corporate tax reform. there seems to be bipartisan support for that. will we solve if you will the fiscal challenges of the year, no, we'll still be kicking cans down the road, use whatever cliches you want. there's a bit of momentum finally in the right direction. there's economic momentum in the u.s. that will reduce some of the political pressure. the u.s. isn't europe and a deal isn't as urgent and won't be until 2013, but i think a little less polarized than it has been in obama's first term. >> on that optimistic note, thank you, all. we look forward -- it's a good way to say happy 2013. we will be back. ...and down. just use your maxperks card and get a case of x-9 paper for only 1-cent after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... ...at officemax. sfx- "sounds of african drum and fl
't think there is one blinding moment where everybody sort of gets religion and says we're going to do it, but we're on our way back. >> positive signs. economic growth will probably pick up and a good chance we'll get comprehensive immigration reform in 2013, which would be good for any number of reasons. corporate tax reform. there seems to be bipartisan support for that. we'll resolve, if you will, the fiscal challenges of the year? no. we'll kick cans down the road. use whatever cliche you want. a bit of momentum, finally, in the right direction. >> economic momentum in the u.s. that will reduce some of the political pressure. the u.s. isn't europe and a deal isn't as urgent and won't be until 2013, but i think a little less polarized than it has been in obama's first term. >> on that optimistic note, thank you, all. good way to say it, happy 2013. >>> we will be back. him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve
are hard-core religion. they are going to do what they want to do. if they wanted some kind of change, the people themselves would have fought just like our forefathers fought for our rights. host: more from the front page article in "the wall street journal." joseph from cincinnati, ohio on the line for republicans. caller: hello. how are you doing? i am glad to be able to comment. i think this is a very historic moment. i am proud of obama and karzai getting up there. we have to end the war some time. my thesis is if we have the talent than -- taliban, terrorism has to be fought all over the world. this is the message they are both saying. it is a long drawn out war. it has to end sometime. if we are pulling out a little sooner, there will be critics saying a lot of different things. i really pray and hope this is successful. the education i think is very important. host: jim from tennessee on the line for independents. caller: i watched the press conference between the two presidents. karzai and his government are one of the most corrupt governments ever. we have lost billions of d
of freedom of religion and separation of church and state. >> roger williams was the founder of rhode island, the founder of providence, and also a founder of the first baptist church in america. williams was going -- born in london. his birth records were burned up in the great london fire of 1666. he became a chaplain for one of the chiefs. because he was a puritan and the church was cracking down and putting his people in jail, he fled england. he arrived in boston in february. he believed the state had no role to play in religion. this was an absolutely radical idea at his time. every country in europe had a state church, so did massachusetts and the plymouth colony. they all had their own state- supported churches. the taxes of the people paid for the ministers and the buildings. you had to go to church or they would come and get you and fine you. williams said the state has no role whatsoever to play in religion. eventually, he was put on trial there and convicted of sedition and heresy and was going to be shipped back to england where he probably would have died. before they could exe
and women. in india, this comes out of religion, out of caste, out of culture. the people who get elected are sometimes traditional leaders. they don't want to overturn these traditions. it's very hard to get oppressed minorities to be given their due. >> fareed zakaria, thank you very much. be sure to catch a special edition of "gps" on sunday, focusing on the president's second term. he gets advice on how the president should handle the challenges he'll be facing over the next four years. "memo to the president, roadmap for a second term." it airs sunday night at 8:00 p.m. >>> tomorrow, padma lakshmi is "outfront." the former model who was born in india and spent a lot of time there, she spends a lot of time there and speaks out for the first time about the rape and her country. >> and we're moments away from the biggest college football game of the year. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus severe cold and flu fights your worst flu symptoms, plus that cough. [ sighs ] thanks!... [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer
of religion and the right to bear arms protects it. they are going to win politically if this is not handled differently. >> when you say handled differently -- so yesterday, let me -- didn't mean to talk over you there. let me -- >> no, that's okay. >> yesterday vice president biden almost seemed to acknowledge the -- what arguably is maybe impossible politics now on capitol hill on this issue. of trying to maybe re -- reinstate the assault weapons ban. when he spoke of executive action, was that a mistake by vice president biden? using that phrase? >> well, i dash i don't think it was a mistake. i think clearly there is executive action that can take place to take the mental health issues. we have how many law, hundreds, thousands of laws in place that, quite frankly, aren't being implemented or aren't being enforced. we aren't keeping the records that people are supposed to be -- keeping records on. we need to keep the guns out of people we already know shun have guns in their hands that with mental health issues. so that's something that -- should be there. to ban assault weapons is goin
of the people? this is a bunch of criminals. those who use a religion in order to kill, collectively, and support to gangsters. every time the army stands hand in hand with the people, they come closer to their demise. however, they began to kill in the front lines, and they used bloodshed, and because the ideology of religious difference is new to us as something strange to us, and therefore, it we have terrorists that describe themselves as jihadists -- al qaeda. they lead terrorist organizations on the ground, and those who are armed on the front line, they move to the back lines in order to use looting and feeding -- feeding -- thieving, those who know nothing but the language of killing and bloodshed. we brothers fight against this. many of them are not serious. they came for sinister ideologies and false ideologies they called a jihad, which is very far from jihad and islam. the people we are facing are those ideologues from al qaeda. we know how they were sponsored three decades ago by the west and the arab the money, and, of course, after the demise of the soviet union, they
, i think for a lot of people in prison, finding some kind of religion is a way for solace and for community building in the prisons, and so there, you know, there is -- there's sometimes a lot of kind of good community building that comes with that, and that's why the aclu's litigated to protect the religious rights of prisoners, religious access, access to places to worship and things like that because there's actually a lot of good that can come from people finding that kind of community. one more question? >> i heard that aclu, housing people in prison, but what about people who have been through the prison, and, perhaps it's witnessing conduct, and what's, you know, what is the goal? there's conviction to read, and there's the other thing with the charge, and -- >> we do a lot of work on police reform. affiliates, especially, work on excessive use of force cases. they work on racial profiling matters. we run the gamet on police reform. we are sometimes working collaboration with police departments to reform their policies and practices and training, and so we do a lot
to bear arms in this country and believe it is as core to them as freedom of speech or freedom of religion. i think the laws that are on the books now would not have kept someone like my father from having a gun. we have real issues on mental health that have to be addressed. we are not seeing money put into programs on the books. but i don't understand why anybody needs an assault weapon in this country. i hope that everybody will come to a table. otherwise people are going to go to their corners and fight not seeing what we need to see get done. >> when you see a movement to restrict gun ownership rights, the inevitable outcome is gun sales, magazine sales, ammo sales guthrough the roof. it is the polar opposite intention of what people on debbie's side. argument want to see. >> we saw this before president obam was elected, when hadt looked like he was going to be elected in 2008 and the time period between the inauguration, you see the big jump in gun sales. there has been some degree of... too much concern on the part of gun owners and people said, the president's going to take away a
. these are a bunch of criminals. but those who use religion in order to kill collectively and supporting gangsters, every time the army stands hand in hand with the people, they come closer to their demise. however, they began to kill in the front lines. they used blood shed. the ideology of religious difference is new to us, and is something strange to us. we have terrorists that have the ideology of al-qaeda, describe themselves as jihadists, they lead terrorist organizations in the ground. the use of back lines in order to lead thieving and looting to help those religious groups who know nothing but the language of killing and bloodshed. we, brothers, fight against these people. many of them are not syrians. they came for sinister ideologies and falls ideologies that they call jihad, which is far from jihad and islam. the people we are facing are those ideologues of al qaeda. three decades ago, we know how they were sponsored by the west and by arab money. after the demise of the soviet union, they went from afghanistan. they went into the west. they tried to get rid of them in afghanistan and
. connell: think about this and take as you said take religion out of it for a moment because it brings up kind of the wider discussion of how do we use technology to, you know, make us more efficient or even make us safer. we're having all these discussions in schools about after the shooting in connecticut maybe something like this or more technology would be used. but you can't force people to do it, you're saying. >> let me try and crystallize the argument for you, one school of thought is you need to balance safety with freedom. and then freedom will include privacy. another school of thought is safety and privacy are not equal. privacy is the greater good. privacy is a natural right. i can keep myself safe, but i need the government to stay away from me to keep my privacy. there's no balance between them. it's a bias in favor of privacy. the burden should be on the government to prove why this is necessary, not on the defendant, the student, to prove why this is harmful. dagen: but the momentum is toward greater security. >> yes, the government either based on sound reasoning and log
's actually based in three different influences. there is superstition. there is religion and there is culture. i'll give you a couple of examples. >> alisyn: let's talk about the superstition -- sorry, the lucky las vegas. people in las vegas, you found, are price -- what's the commonnallity of how they're pricing their properties? >> well, of course, the slot machines and 7, 7, 7. that's the lucky number. so people are pricing their homes with their lucky number 777. and i have an example. this is a great con did he that's actually for sale right now in las vegas and it's priced at $777,000. it's three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths. 2800 square feet. beautiful unit. and it's got incredible dead on views of the las vegas strip and priced with that lucky number. i even got a tweet this morning from a realtor who seder his client is a gambler and he priced it at 777,000, $777. people do it. >> alisyn: that's the jackpot. let's talk about what you said about religion. what have you noticed in the bible belt states about pricing? >> well, obviously in bible belt, in the new testament and in the bible, jo
among christians when it comes to gun control. i mean, a public religion institute survey which of taken before the newtown shooting showed that white evangelical protestants were less likely to favor tighter gun laws than catholics. white mainline protestants are religiously unaffiliated americans. why do you think that is? >> thank you for that question. i mean, i think that's a wonderful question. we should not be surprised that many of our people of faith in this country who are all americans, are very much passionate about the second amendment and gun rights. at the same time, we should not -- we should also not be surprised that there are just as many people of faith if not more who are all in favor of common sense gun laws and promoting a culture of peace and healing in our communities. and i believe that it is our time and our moment to look within ourselves and the principles of our faith to unite our country around a common moral imperative to address the gun violence that is in our country. even to those statistics that you've just lifted up, interestingly enough, the national
governments. it does not happen that way. culture, tradition, religion, ethnic, are all part of that. i talked about alliances. that is why alliances are important. you work within those systems. to effect change and influence change. there are some things going on in the world today that are disgusting, that are despicable, that we hate. but we have limitations as to what we can do to change that. we should always be about helping the people who want to change it. we have limitations. and great powers run into very difficult times when they do not recognize that they too have limitations to their power. all individuals have limitations. nations must be wise enough to understand this. host: as senator chuck hagel, in his speech, and two years ago -- as you hear the words he talks about the limits of power. that echoed what the president said that in 2008 when he was running for the white house. guest: i think that is right. i think one of the conditions that president obama and his team -- a lot of demands and expectations of rumba world and a lot of challenges. america's role is not just to k
people here in washington, but the treasury secretary nominee has an extra challenge. his religion. he talked about that with cnn's candy crowley back in 2011, when he was director of the office of management and budget. >> you are an orthodox jew, which means that you can't use electrical devices, over the weekend, friday night sundown to saturday. how does that work in a 24/7 job? have you ever had to cheat? >> well, it's actually not cheating. if there's a matter of real urgency, it is totally consistent with my religious beliefs to do whatever i need to do to deal with it. the hard part is making that judgment of what's an emergency and what's not. what's really serious. and frankly, the hardest part is saying to yourself, that it won't change the outcome if i'm not involved. and i've found that there's an enormous amount of respect, has been from the time i was very young, working for speaker o'neil, from working for two presidents, to taking things that are of real importance seriously. and when the phone rings on saturday, i don't have to wonder whether i need to pick it pup the
at a relatively slow rate because we're a mature economy and too many people out there -- >> not religions, ngulatioregulh government policy -- >> it is but the world environment is too intense. >> what do you think, michael? >> there's truth and valid points. one thing is interesting, believing you will have a robust -- earnings will be driven by the consumers supposedly putting in double-digits growth in the next few months. byron hit good points, expecting things to come down. this cocktail being brewed up in washington. if you were a business leader and listened to these guys on calls, would you want to be drinking with what these guys are brewing? i don't know. i think they will be conservative. i don't think you will have a cap x driver behind uncertainty. there's a lot of wild cards. a ssymmetrical performance.ear it's a mixed bag and no conviction in the marketplace, so much contradictory information, some says things are better and things are worse. >> corporations have had it good in terms of profit margins, interest rates, ability to borrow. >> they're peeking. >> the only way t
, in mythical narrative's, whether it is creationism, or the fact that muslims are a satanic religion. you cannot rationally argue with people who think the earth was created 6000 years ago and adam-and-eve used to ride on the backs of dinosaurs. the only thing you can do is reintegrate them into the economy. that is what frightens me. when you fall to that level of desperation, and this is exactly what tore apart yugoslavia with these ethnic, nationalist identities. there becomes an inability to communicate. a year ago we had several hundred white guys dressed in confederate uniforms margin to montgomery. half of that city is black. to carry out a re-enactment of the inauguration of jefferson davis. it cannot carry out a dialogue. that is what frightens me. we have powerful movements that celebrate the gun culture, the language of violence, that demonize the marginal and the week, whether it is african-americans, homosexuals, women, liberals. i see that breakdown occurring because of the economic disintegration, and having lived through it in places like yugoslavia, the rational argument
liberalism from liberals and religion from the religious. extremist-dominated debate where most people who are involved, who own guns, who might use them for sporting purposes aren't in favor of these assault weapons. they're not -- these things are made, these high-capacity magazines, these weapons, are made to simulate a kind of military-style engagement. here's my suggestion. anyone who wants to do that should volunteer to go join the military. >> ask wes moore about that. >> yeah. and go deal with that. so it's time for moderate people -- i own guns. it's time for people like me who own guns, who think that -- but think that the extremists have gone too far to actually take a stand on it. the second point -- and chris christie was making this point yesterday -- is it's not just about guns. and this goes to your question. it's about violence. and it's about the video games. and it's about culture. and that's not a bill. that's not a piece of legislation. it's a broad hour-to-hour household-to-household battle that requires parents, teachers, everyone to be engaged. and i think being eng
grandfather, more than any religion, my grandfather would recite the declaration of independence, the preamble, and the gettysburg address to his kids and we came to believe those things as the most important thing we believed then. we believe in justice and of the ruling bloc. e of laaw. our values are our greatest strength in the world, as ronald reagan said. i believe what moe and andy said that principals are not something you the paper. they matter when you are tested and you have to do it. i believe in saying that the worst places in hell are reserved for those who stand silent in the face of injustice. [applause] >> i will open it up to questions, if you can identify yourself and ask a question and wait for the microphone. >> i am with free-speech radio news -- you spoke about the road blocks from congress. can anyone on the panel talk more about the specific ones that were just renewed or past and what impact that will have? >> this is becoming a new year's eve tradition. congress passes the national defense authorization act and it has included language that prohibits using any of the
religion and its own incompatible view of the other is going to have to put up with the other and find ways to work together and apple and google for example the compete and the newcomers appear. but they are not members of the gang of four. >> i'm not suggesting this. there are many candidates. twitter is one that has been suggested and even netflix as i mentioned and of course microsoft is absent and my calculation or they certainly wish that they were. [laughter] >> we have some very good questions from the floor that relate to some of this, so one question is all the scrutiny over the day the effect that business strategy? >> what happens with all of these companies to collect a lot of data and each of them has different rules. it's largely going to be controlled by the privacy and something called the european data protectorate which is all about what you do with the big data analytics and i think the same solution is going to say that the data is owned by the person, not by the company, or at least cannot be used without that person's permission and that the anonymous the the house to
role in peace in the world and tolerance within cultures and different religions? do you see there is hope for peace in the world? >> i am an optimist to a fault. if you do not inherently trust your fellow men and women to be smart and decent, then you do not believe in democracy and free market in education, because they are all a bunch of dolts. your question about social media is right. it is not a mediator, it is connecting us. it is important to say that those revolutions were not done by tools, they were done by brave people. they have hard work to do right now, and let's hope these tools can help them. but the responsibility is all there. >> amanda, i have a question for you. if i were able to produce a ukulele, would you be willing to play us a song? >> may be. [applause] >> and a microphone, too. >> thank you. speaking of -- i love your question and your answer. i want to go on record saying i have never seen a more positive change than hanging out on twitter for the last few years. i think it's extraordinary what is happening, especially looking at young people and
, not people who come in, imported from outside. these are a bunch of criminals. but those who use religion in order to kill collectively and supporting gangsters, every time the army stands hand in hand with the people, they come closer to their demise. however, they began to kill in the front lines. they used blood shed. the ideology of religious difference is new to us, and is something strange to us. we have terrorists that have the ideology of al-qaeda, describe themselves as jihadists, they lead terrorist organizations in the ground. the use of back lines in order to lead thieving and looting to help those religious groups who know nothing but the language of killing and bloodshed. we, brothers, fight against these people. many of them are not syrians. they came for sinister ideologies and falls ideologies that they call jihad, which is far from jihad and islam. the people we are facing are those ideologues of al qaeda. three decades ago, we know how they were sponsored by the west and by arab money. after the demise of the soviet union, they went from afghanistan. they went into the
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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